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Siemens Transportation Systems

Five "Whispering Engines" for Hong Kong

Siemens Transportation Systems (Erlangen/Munich) recently delivered five diesel-electric locomotives to the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation in Hong Kong in collaboration with Siemens Procurement and Logistics Services (SPLS).

Once Siemens TS had delivered the locomotives built in Munich to Bremerhaven, the Hamburg business location took on responsibility for onward transportation. For the transshipment of the engines, which each weighed 80 tons and which had reached Bremerhaven on their own axles, the heavy transport experts used two mobile cranes. Working in tandem,  they lowered each of the colossi with a length of almost 20 meters on to a special mafi trailer, where it was securely lashed down.

In order to prevent the wheels or axles from being distorted during transportation, the engines' steering bogies were laid on special "beddings". This allowed the wheels to rotate freely.

 DB Schenker Hamburg and  DB Schenker Hong Kong work hand in hand
Thus prepared, the freight complete with trailers arrived in Wilhelmsen on the Ro/Ro ship "Falstaff" owned by the firm of Wallenius. After a 30-day journey by sea the engines arrived in the port of Hong Kong safely and on time. Then scarcely had the engines arrived in the "Land of the Smile" when the management of the project was transferred seamlessly to the local  DB Schenker company. For direct onward transport  DB Schenker had already chartered a heavy goods barge with a 235-ton crane that was capable of taking the engines. For the transshipment at the port it was necessary to build a 120-ton traverse specially certified for the purpose.

Particularly quiet locomotives
The last stage of the journey on the heavy goods barge brought the engines to the Kowloon (Jiulong) Peninsula, where they were put directly on to the tracks. Then the officers of the Kowloon-Canton Railway Corporation were able to take delivery of their super modern diesel locomotives which are also known as the "whispering engines" because of their exceptionally low noise emission.

Last modified: 11.02.2014

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